Page Nav

HIDE

Gradient Skin

Gradient_Skin

Responsive Ad

Myanmar's Suu Kyi appears in court in person for first time since coup

Berita 24 English -  Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar's deposed leader, appeared in person at a court hearing on Monday for the first time sinc...


Berita 24 English - 
Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar's deposed leader, appeared in person at a court hearing on Monday for the first time since her government was deposed by the military in a Feb. 1 coup her lawyer.

Suu Kyi appeared to be in good health and met with her legal team for approximately 30 minutes before the hearing, lawyer The Maung Maung said.

Suu Kyi, 75, who was awarded the 1991 Nobel Peace Prize for promoting democracy, is one of more than 4,000 people detained since the coup. She is charged with various offences, including illegal possession of walkie-talkie radios and violating a state secrets law.

In her meeting with her lawyers, the ousted leader "wished people good health" and made an apparent reference to her National League for Democracy party, which may be dissolved soon.

"She stated that the party was founded for the people and will remain so as long as the people exist," The Maung Maung told Reuters.

Myanmar's junta-appointed election commission will dissolve Suu Kyi's political party over allegations of vote fraud in November's election. Media reported Friday, citing a commissioner who threatened action against "traitors" involved.

The army seized power in November, alleging fraud in an election won by Suu Kyi's party. The former electoral commission had dismissed its allegations.

Min Aung Hlaing, the junta leader, also stated in his first interview with foreign media since the coup that Suu Kyi was in good health while disputing the number of people killed by security forces during protests since the coup.

Myanmar has been in chaos since the army took power, with daily protests, marches, and strikes against the junta, to which the junta has responded with lethal force, killing over 800 people, according to the activist group Assistance Association for Political Prisoners.

Min Aung Hlaing stated in a May 20 interview that the actual death toll was around 300 and that 47 police officers were also killed.

Reponsive Ads